Saint Thomas More 8 July 2017

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Portrait de Saint Thomas More, mort à Tower Hill (Londres) en 1535. The original uploader was Gwengoat at French Wikipedia – Transferred from fr.wikipedia to Commons by Bloody-libu using CommonsHelper.
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Description
Français : Portrait de Saint Thomas More, mort à Tower Hill (Londres) en 1535.
Date 11 May 2006 (original upload date)
Source Transferred from fr.wikipedia to Commons by Bloody-libu using CommonsHelper.
Author The original uploader was Gwengoat at French Wikipedia
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Attribution  By The original uploader was Gwengoat at French Wikipedia [CC BY 1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/1.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Thomas More Biography.com

Journalist, Lawyer, Philosopher, Saint(1478–1535)

Thomas More is known for his 1516 book Utopia and for his untimely death in 1535, after refusing to acknowledge King Henry VIII as head of the Church of England. He was canonized by the Catholic Church as a saint in 1935.
At Odds With Henry & Subsequent BeheadingMore’s fate would begin to turn when, in the summer of 1527, King Henry tried to use the Bible to prove to More that Henry’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon, who had failed to produce a male heir, was void. More tried to share the king’s viewpoint, but it was in vain, and More could not sign off on Henry’s plan for divorce.

In 1532, More resigned from the House of Commons, citing poor health. The real reason, however, was probably his disapproval of Henry’s recent disregard of the laws of the church and his divorce of Catherine. More did not attend the subsequent coronation of Anne Boleyn in June 1533, and the king did not view this in a very kind light, and his vengeance was imminent.

In February 1534, More was accused of being complicit with Elizabeth Barton, who opposed Henry’s break with Rome. And in April, the final straw came when More refused to swear to Henry’s Act of Succession and the Oath of Supremacy. This amounted to More essentially refusing to accept the king as head of the Church of England, which More believed would disparage the power of the pope. More was sent to the Tower of London on April 17, 1534, and was found guilty of treason.

Thomas More was beheaded on July 6, 1535. He left behind the final words: “The king’s good servant, but God’s first.” More was beatified in 1886 and canonized by the Catholic Church as a saint in 1935. He has also been deemed a “Reformation martyr” by the Church of England.

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